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Posts Tagged ‘Stinkhorn fungi’

I spotted the fungus – one of the most spectacular of all fungi – the lattice stinkhorn (Colus pusillus) in a damp native flower bed beside the footpath. My morning, filled with sad goodbyes to my partner and dog, had suddenly got brighter! Nature never ceases to amazing me and uplift my spirits. 


Lattice stinkhorn (Colus pusillus) spotted at Caloundra on the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Check out this great document from the Queensland Mycological Society on Colus pusillus here.

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While walking back to my office from  training session, I noticed some Stinkhorn fungi in a flower bed. In fact there were multiple specimens of two different species of Stinkhorn fungi located in close proximity to each other (see fourth photo) –

  • Asteroe rubra – a red star shaped Stinkhorn fungus
  •  Phallus rubicundus – a red phallic shaped Stinkhorn fungus

   
    
   

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Red Stinkhorn fungi (Phallus rubicundus) spotted on a flower bed. I even spotted some flys attracted by the pungent foul smelling or dour omitted by the fungus specimens.    

    
    
 

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On two morning walks over the Australian Labour Day long weekend, I spotted a collection of stinkhorn fungi, Astorae Rubra. The specimens were spotted amongst bark chips in flower beds in a coastal environment (sandy soil). There had been a number of afternoon storms (a sign in Queensland that summer is faster approaching) in the previous week teamed with warm humid weather. Perfect conditions for fungal growth.    

    
 

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While taking a break from work I took in some wildlife and fungi spotting. Accidental really, but it’s a given as there is so much wildlife and vegetation on campus. I observed a maturing Plover/Masked Lapwing (Vanellus miles) chick with its parents keeping a watchful eye on it as people walked past. The parents called to the chick as I approached. Perhaps they were warning it to be cautious? I was quiet pleased (and surprised) to spot some specimens of a stinkhorn fungi – the Crinoline Fungus (Phallus multicolor) nestled amongst some grass in a flower bed. This is another species I hadn’t had the opportunity to observe before. 











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