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Archive for March, 2015

A selection of photos of the array of fungi I spotted in late March 2015. Most fungal specimens were spotted in the grounds of the state university I work at in Queensland, Australia and in local area near my house.









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On the Saturday 21st March, my girl and I took a trip to the Gold Coast – a popular coastal tourist spot in southern Queensland, to visit a former flatmate and friend of ours. After lunch at a local Mexican restaurant, we took a still on the beach at Burleigh Heads. Seaweed, algae and what looked like a type of kelp was washed up on the beach. There were a number intact specimens, where you could clearly observe the stem and roots. I love seeing nature so close to a popular surf and tourist spot. 











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While taking a break from work I took in some wildlife and fungi spotting. Accidental really, but it’s a given as there is so much wildlife and vegetation on campus. I observed a maturing Plover/Masked Lapwing (Vanellus miles) chick with its parents keeping a watchful eye on it as people walked past. The parents called to the chick as I approached. Perhaps they were warning it to be cautious? I was quiet pleased (and surprised) to spot some specimens of a stinkhorn fungi – the Crinoline Fungus (Phallus multicolor) nestled amongst some grass in a flower bed. This is another species I hadn’t had the opportunity to observe before. 











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I partook of a bit of weekend fungi spotting on Saturday 28 February – while hanging out the washing and going for a late afternoon walk along a country road. I spotted some large pale brown mushroom-like specimens and pulled one out of the ground with a twig (I’m always cautious of touching fungal specimens with my bare hands). The specimen was quiet mature with greeny-grey spores leaving a smudge on the adjacent mushroom. I’m unsure what genus and species the specimens were, but I’m going to read some fungal identification books and websites to try and identify the specimens.

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On my morning walk to work I was lucky to observe some excellent fungal specimens, including mushrooms, bird nest fungi (possibly Cyathus stercoreus) and two types of Stinkhorn fungi – Colus pusillus and Phallus rubicundus. The Colus pusillus specimens were scattered amongst mulch at the base of a large old tree. I have only observed this fungus once before (and the specimen was quiet old and shrivelled) so I was really happy to be able to observe and photograph a variety of specimens of this fascinating fungal species.



















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